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Thread: old rigger- more questions

  1. #1
    DelawareDave
    I posted some questions for you over in the "Tahiti fans" post concerning Hawaiian boats layup.
    Originally Posted by old rigger
    When Hawaiian fired up I had just graduated high school in '74 and went to work there in the glass dept. Of course my dad went there too. When they folded up I went to Rogers and thats where I learned to rig, 1980.
    My dad got out of it at the same time, after the energy crunch.
    You two must have worked together back in the late 60's early 70's, his name was Dick Turner.
    So what could you tell me about the actual construction on a Hawaiian? Mine is a 1975 18'. I am interested in knowing if there is plywood around the bottom side edge of the deck around the bow. The deck on mine has a noticeable low area on the port side, between the bow and the dash. The stbd side of the deck is nice and straight from stem to stern. I plan on removing the deck over the winter to replace the wood under the deck at the stern and dash, as well as the transom, stringers, and floor. It also appears the bustle was cracked on the port side and repaired, but left low at the break. The radius across the top does not flow smoothly from one side to the other.

  2. #2
    blown428fe
    :coffeycup BUMP

  3. #3
    DelawareDave
    Thanks, blown. I think I need to "borrow" your avatar

  4. #4

  5. #5
    DelawareDave
    KOOL! Thanks

  6. #6
    blown428fe
    No Problem.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,871
    I posted some questions for you over in the "Tahiti fans" post concerning Hawaiian boats layup.
    So what could you tell me about the actual construction on a Hawaiian? Mine is a 1975 18'. I am interested in knowing if there is plywood around the bottom side edge of the deck around the bow. The deck on mine has a noticeable low area on the port side, between the bow and the dash. The stbd side of the deck is nice and straight from stem to stern. I plan on removing the deck over the winter to replace the wood under the deck at the stern and dash, as well as the transom, stringers, and floor. It also appears the bustle was cracked on the port side and repaired, but left low at the break. The radius across the top does not flow smoothly from one side to the other.
    All the boats were hand laminated at Hawaiian, except for the tri-hulls.
    The deck did have plywood laminated to it. That wood should be in OK condition, no mater what your boats been through unless it's been sunk.
    Is there a bulkhead in the boat? That alone should have kept the deck from saggng. When you get to the point of putting your boat back together, make sure none of the side braces, bulkhead or any thing else to bond in there does not actually touch the bottom or sides of the hull. You'll get stress cracks where they touch if you don't already have them.
    You should be able to get the nice crown back to the deck when you rebuild, raise the gunnales to get the look with a small bottle jack and then fit your braces and bulkhead. The tops of the side braces should only touch the gunnale wood, nothing else.
    The top of the bulkhead should not be touching the deck either (the way it came from the shop. oops) hold it in place with some wedges, then bond it in. The bottom of the bulkhead can rest on the little bit of floor between the stringers.
    The hull might grow wider after you cut the deck off, which is no big deal, just be aware of that when it comes time to bond the deck back in place. (actually the sides of the hull will more than likely suck in the area where the side tanks would mount. The sides forward of that will try to fan out. At least that's what I've found)
    Make sure to keep the deck on a nice support or it'll change shape too and then you're in for a little bit of a struggle. Keep it out of the sun as well once it's cut apart. Obvious stuff I know, but I just threw it out there because I've done what you're about to do a few times.
    When you place the deck back on, it can be done with 2 in masking tape and a good stiff putty knife. Rest the deck on 3 pieces of wood, one laying on the deck one across the bow about 2 feet back from the point of the boat. The other two at each corner of the boat. Try to line up deck over the hull where all corners match, or are at least close. lol
    You can either start at the transom, or the bow, it's your call. I always liked to start at the transom, once it's lined up slide out one board, at the transom, and tape up that corner. Move to the other corner and do the same. Don't worry about the fit between deck and hull at the transom right now, just the corners. You should already have double layers of tape along the deck spaced about 8 inches apart waiting for you to work your way up the boat, taped down on the deck and just hanging over the hull or flipped back over itself.
    You can just reach in and give the hull a tap with your hand if the sides need to come out a little and when they're lined up, apply a little pressure on the deck and tape down a few feet of it. Make sure that you don't push the deck down to far and by that I mean the guy who's job it was to grind the boat once it got out of the mold didn't care one way or the other how the boat fit. He might have ground a nice low spot in the hull and it's very easy to make the deck follow that dip, giving a nice divit where you should have nice straight lines.
    When you get past the dash, you'll need to use the putty knife to either work the sides in or out, sliding the remaining piece of wood a little more forward as you move along. You can alway use a bunch of body language here too, using the tops of your thighs, knees, anything else you can think of to move the boat into place.
    If the hull grew in length, you can use a jack and gently raise the bow of the boat under the bow eye to match up the parts, do this only after the side are taped down up to the dash.
    Sometime you have to tape a putty knife in place and leave it there applying a little presure either in or out. If need be, just bond the boat that way and slide out the knife after it kicked.
    Getting back to the transom, sometimes the deck will try to pull in right where it meets the hull. That little lip where your bond is going to be is what I'm talking about. Sometimes you have to use fender washers, small plates, whatever the case, to line that section up. Not all the time, but now and then it happens.
    Sorry I didn't see your question before and sorry for the long winded post. I hope it makes sense.

  8. #8
    blown428fe
    Old Rigger - Very Nice Instructions, Your The Man. You Wouldnt Happen To Know The Weight Of These Hulls Would You?

  9. #9
    Boatcop
    Old Rigger - Very Nice Instructions, Your The Man
    Can a Rigga get a WHOOP-WHOOP?

  10. #10
    Boatcop
    I posted some questions for you over in the "Tahiti fans" post concerning Hawaiian boats layup.
    Dave,
    Do you ever run in the Delaware River? (Dodging the tugs & tankers) Particularly up to the Rancocas Creek area in South Jersey, across from Philly?
    The reason I ask, is that back in the mid-'70s, there was a bada$$ flatty, running out of there named "Screaming Yellow Zonker".
    He used to out run our CG Patrol Boats all the time. I was wondering if that boat was still around that neck of the woods?

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